Gimbel’s classical figure painting

"Gimbel’s classical figure painting of mostly solitary figures is impressive and pleasing at first. Relaxed, confident renderings of lounging nudes contrasted with a bold abstract expressionist style plays to the masses in a largely effective way. The artist’s instinctual, fuck-all brushwork excels on long appendages in particular, tugging the viewer along through complex color fields with real verve, confidence, and subtlety."
1of1 Magazine review by Raymundo Munoz


"Reconfigured begins in the entry spaces with the work of Jason Lee Gimbel, who renders the full figure through abstract-expressionist brushwork and non-naturalistic colors. Gimbel, a well-known Denver artist, has created what are essentially painted drawings, or maybe even sketches, conceived as full-blown paintings. He outlines figures, but only partly, and shifts the color he uses in a seemingly random and instinctual way. Those colors have been ably picked, too, with Gimbel’s taste often leaning toward light and sunny tones. The left-out parts force our mind’s eye to fill in the gaps, and from my perspective, the paintings in which the figure was the least finished — the ones in which elements of the body and the background would simply evaporate toward the edges — were the standouts. I was particularly taken by “se la mia morte brami,” “Yellow Bird” and “Through the Blue Window.”"
Westword review by Michael Paglia


"For Loss of Wonder, a solo made up of monumental figure drawings. Though somewhat classical, the drawings are informal in their rendering and presentation. Some have a quick-sketch look, with the imagery disintegrating at the edges, and they've been done on newsprint paper held to the wall by magnets."
Westword review by Michael Paglia


"Jason Lee Gimbel, made up of a small selection of paintings and drawings. The best of the paintings — and all the drawings — are very good. Like Stoehr, Gimbel creates work at the intersection of abstraction and representation. His most recent paintings, "Woman and the Green Chair" and "Femme Assise dans un Fauteuil" (pictured), are absolute knockouts. Gimbel has said that the inspiration for these pieces was a couple of old green chairs kicking around the RedLine figure-drawing workshops, as well as Picasso's taste for women and green chairs."
Westword review by Michael Paglia